Wednesday, June 16, 2010

I Was Led Down The Primrose Path













These pretty flowers are popping up in quite a few places all around town, and it took me the longest time to identify them. But now I know they are primroses. Identification was so hard because there are over 450 different species, all looking so different. The last picture is one I got from the web. It is a picture of a different primrose, just to show you how the different varieties don't look anything alike. The English love primroses and have a special relationship with them. They seem to be an enchanted flower, because there is a lot of folklore linking primroses and fairies! Long ago, mothers told their children that primroses were the little houses of fairies, who would stay in them as protetction from the rain. Legend also says that eating primroses would allow you to see the fairy folk! So many children would eat the flowers in hopes of seeing a fairy. Oh, and about my title, an old saying that I haven't heard in ages. To "lead someone down the primrose path" means to deceive them into thinking that something is easier than it really is. But there was one person who never did that.


"Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you and learn from me, for I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For my yoke is easy and my burden is light." Matthew 11:28,30

14 comments:

Kilauea Poetry said...

Hello Ginny..that was sweet- and I'd feel exactly the same! The pinks do look both lovely and enchanting! I had no idea. There were that many varieties! The darker ones are very different but pretty too! The background and legend are perfect as well as the verse! Great info and post for such a important herb! (Isn't it medicinal)? I wanted to say your previous header was stunning and all those events (which occurred on the
Particular year)..that come out of Phil's book? Neat-

Stacey Dawn said...

Wow - certainly a very different variety. Pretty!!

SquirrelQueen said...

Primrose are so pretty. I can see how they became so linked to legend and folklore, something so beautiful would have been considered magical.

diane said...

Thank you for your comment. Yes Bustard Head gets its name from the bird. In 1770 when James Cook landed in that area looking for water they shot and ate birds which they thought was a Bustard but I'm not sure which bird it was. Cook named the headland.

Sandra said...

I KNOW no one could lead YOU down the primrose path because you are just like ME. the post is great. the flowers are beautiful. and you are so right about Him not leading us down the primrose path. have a good day today, what is the last photo?

hip chick said...

Beautiful verse. And, as always I love the way you blend the verses into your everyday posts. Just the way it should be. Those primroses with the yellow are so interesting. I'm not sure I have ever seen that color before.
To answer your comment on my blog...
bee balm is also known as Monarda or Oswego tea (because the Oswego Indians used it to make a tea) The type in my garden is a reddish/pink color and that is what the hummingbirds like. There are many red flowers that attract them. They even like our hanging carnations.

Bird Girl said...

I've only ever seen primrose at the nursery and when my husband's aunt went to England. She sent lots of pictures of them - but they were very bright colors compared to your light pinks. How dainty and pretty yours are and they look like the leaf is a bit varigated.
The English sure did seem to be obsessed with fairies - and fairy tales. I love those old paintings of fairies on flowers.

Lucy said...

I want to just bust out into song...."Primrose Lane..life's a holiday on Primrose Lake.....ladeedadedadde....."

I love those little cute flowers. And you're right. There must be many kinds of them. Ours here look just a tad diffent that your but not by much.

Stephanie V said...

Our primroses have come and gone - nice to see some again. I love them as they are such a bright treat in our sometimes dull spring.
The black and yellow one is my favorite. There is one in the garden at our seniors' center...I'm always wishing it was big enough to divide. It's so striking and unusual. Maybe it's better left where it is then it will always be special.

DawnTreader said...

I had no idea these were edible! I don't think they grow wild in Sweden, possibly in gardens, but I know them best as potted plants indoors in the spring. I never managed to keep one alive for very long though.

Together We Save said...

Beautiful flowers and ediable too?? I did not know.

S. Etole said...

Thanks for your visit today and leading me here. I have wondered, too, what those pretty pink blooms in my flowerbed are.

Glenda said...

Such beautiful primroses! I always learn from your posts; I didn't know you could eat the blooms. And the Scripture is one of my favorites!

Betsy from Tennessee said...

Love the little Primroses, Ginny... I also love your title --and how you related it to the scripture... VERY creative.
Hugs,
Betsy